European Journal of Health and Biology Education

A Week Long Summer Program Does Make a Difference: A Strategy of Increasing Underrepresented Minority Students’ Interest in Science
Mamta Singh 1 *
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1 Department of Teacher Education, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77713, USA
* Corresponding Author
Research Article

European Journal of Health and Biology Education, 2016 - Volume 5 Issue 1, pp. 13-22
https://doi.org/10.20897/lectito.201503

Published Online: 15 Aug 2016

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How to cite this article
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Singh, 2016)
Reference: Singh, M. (2016). A Week Long Summer Program Does Make a Difference: A Strategy of Increasing Underrepresented Minority Students’ Interest in Science. European Journal of Health and Biology Education, 5(1), 13-22. https://doi.org/10.20897/lectito.201503
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Singh M. A Week Long Summer Program Does Make a Difference: A Strategy of Increasing Underrepresented Minority Students’ Interest in Science. European Journal of Health and Biology Education. 2016;5(1):13-22. https://doi.org/10.20897/lectito.201503
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Singh M. A Week Long Summer Program Does Make a Difference: A Strategy of Increasing Underrepresented Minority Students’ Interest in Science. European Journal of Health and Biology Education. 2016;5(1), 13-22. https://doi.org/10.20897/lectito.201503
Chicago
In-text citation: (Singh, 2016)
Reference: Singh, Mamta. "A Week Long Summer Program Does Make a Difference: A Strategy of Increasing Underrepresented Minority Students’ Interest in Science". European Journal of Health and Biology Education 2016 5 no. 1 (2016): 13-22. https://doi.org/10.20897/lectito.201503
Harvard
In-text citation: (Singh, 2016)
Reference: Singh, M. (2016). A Week Long Summer Program Does Make a Difference: A Strategy of Increasing Underrepresented Minority Students’ Interest in Science. European Journal of Health and Biology Education, 5(1), pp. 13-22. https://doi.org/10.20897/lectito.201503
MLA
In-text citation: (Singh, 2016)
Reference: Singh, Mamta "A Week Long Summer Program Does Make a Difference: A Strategy of Increasing Underrepresented Minority Students’ Interest in Science". European Journal of Health and Biology Education, vol. 5, no. 1, 2016, pp. 13-22. https://doi.org/10.20897/lectito.201503
ABSTRACT
The objective of this study was to inspire, engage, and educate minority, underprivileged, low-income middle school students in science. It was a week-long study where students were engaged for 5 hours per day. The content covered was STEM focused embedded with cooperative learning and guided discovery approaches. Students were introduced to the K'NEX Education Amusement Park Experience kit. The students participated in the project theme called “Science of Roller Coaster.” Participants were challenged to use their critical thinking skills to design their individual group Roller Coaster project. The constructivist teaching along with positive reinforcement approaches were used during the program, which allowed the classroom facilitator to develop positive learning environment. Pre-and Post-content knowledge tests along with program satisfactory survey, and reflection were collected. Paired t-test results indicated that students score improved on posttest and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Drawing from the students’ survey and reflective journal responses, the findings suggest that students who had absolute no interest in science prior to attending the program did increase their interest in science as a result of this program.
KEYWORDS
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